Wikimedia Lawsuit Endangers American Rights

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From NEWSMAX.com, the headline reads: “Wikipedia to File Lawsuit Challenging Mass Surveillance by NSA”

The Newsmax story begins:

—BEGIN QUOTE—————————————————————————
“Wikimedia Foundation, the nonprofit organization that runs free online encyclopedia Wikipedia, will file a lawsuit against the National Security Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice, challenging the government’s mass surveillance program.

“The lawsuit, to be filed on Tuesday, alleges that the NSA’s mass surveillance of Internet traffic in the United States – often called Upstream surveillance – violates the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment, which protects freedom of speech and association, and the Fourth Amendment, which protects against unreasonable search and seizure.

“The NSA’s Upstream surveillance program captures communications with “non-U.S. persons” in order to acquire foreign intelligence information.”
—END QUOTE—————————————————————————-

Based on that last sentence, I disagree with “Wikimedia’s” whining and hope our court system understands the potential danger of this lawsuit, should it pass, to the First and Fourth Amendments.

There seems to be, in this case as in many others, an over-generous attitude about the U.S. Constitution. The assumption, in this case, that Constitutional protections should automatically be extended to “non-us persons” simply because American Citizens are involved seems very dangerous; it blurs the line between Constitutional protections specifically extended to American Citizens by the Constitution and those generously “granted” to other world citizens under special circumstances. And, of course, it clearly presents a challenge to the NSA’s ability to protect American Citizens from foreign threats.

The line was, not long ago seriously crossed when our government first brought a non-citizen terrorist combatant to New York, granted him a trial and gave this self-declared enemy of America all the rights of an American Citizen and all the protections of U.S. Criminal law and the U.S Constitution.  Since then, the U.S. Constitution has been stretched and stretched, in different circumstances and in different parts of the world, until it is now in danger of it’s original intent being completely undermined.

Americans are generous people by nature, that comes from the complacency of freedom, but in the case of this Wikimedia lawsuit, suing the NSA and the Justice Department because “non-US persons” are actually being treated like the non-citizens they are and not being allowed protection by the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (which they are NOT entitled to), threatens to stretch our generosity and complacency to a dangerous breaking point.

We are making “baby-steps” toward a One-World Government; Americans need to wake up and stop denying the obvious.

Just to be clear: I’m suggesting that, for the sake of National Security, in the case of correspondence between American Citizens and foreign governments or foreign nationals.it is not unreasonable to expect  American Citizens to forfeit some of their privacy rights. This is especially true and critical in this age of  terrorism, recruitment and solicitation. We have, tragically reached the stage where American citizens cannot be automatically assumed to be “loyal” American citizens. That is the cost of many decades of American complacency and “generosity.”

I know that’s a bitter pill to swallow but if we want America to survive we really DO need to  ‘wake up and stop denying the obvious.’

Harvey

Reference:

Newsmax: NSA Sued by Wikimedia, Rights Groups over Mass Surveillance

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